A Topical Approach to Life-Span Development by John W. Santrock

By John W. Santrock

Proficient and pushed by means of study. At McGraw-Hill, now we have spent hundreds of thousands of hours with you and your scholars, operating to appreciate the major wishes and matters you face within the Human improvement path. the commonest subject matters raised comprise dealing with the immense volume of content material inherent to a Lifespan path and making sure the dependability of the assigned fabric – is it present and actual? the results of this examine is John Santrock's A Topical method of Lifespan improvement, 7e.

Santrock guarantees scholars whole and comprehend the assigned fabric in a few methods: Santrock's hallmark studying targets pedagogy offers a entire roadmap to the textual content fabric, essentially declaring the middle recommendations basic to students' studying and function. McGraw-Hill's LearnSmart raises students' potency in learning through picking what they understand and don't comprehend and offers quick remediation, supporting them to profit the cloth they're being affected by. The connections subject matter maintains within the seventh variation, displaying scholars the various points of lifespan improvement and assisting them to raised comprehend the options. This habitual subject matter of connections – Developmental Connections, Topical Connections, Connecting improvement to lifestyles, Connecting with Careers, and Connections via examine – ties jointly ideas from throughout chapters to enhance the educational approach and fix the fabric to students' daily lives and destiny aspirations. McGraw-Hill's Milestones video and evaluation software is helping convey the direction fabric to existence, so your scholars can witness genuine youngsters constructing through the years. and naturally, all of this fabric is trained by means of our distinctive board of professional individuals – a who's who of developmental psychology – who make sure the fabric is as actual and up to date as possible.

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S. S. S. S. Census Bureau, 2011) Expanded coverage of intergenerational relationships, including a new discussion of the empty nest and its refilling Description of two recent studies that found middle-aged parents provided more support for their children than for their aging parents (Fingerman & others, 2011, 2012) Coverage of recent research that indicated affection and support, reflecting solidarity, were more prevalent in intergenerational relationships than ambivalence was (Hogerbrugge & Komter, 2012) New discussion of how more than 40 percent of middle-aged children (mainly daughters) provide care for their aging parents or parents-in-law (Blieszner & Roberto, 2012) • Description of a recent study that revealed peer rejection was linked to depression in adolescence (Platt, Kadosh, & Lau, 2013) • Discussion of recent meta-analyses that found being a victim of bullying in middle school was linked to having depression later in adolescence and emerging adulthood, and that bullying in middle school was associated with later engagement in antisocial and criminal behavior (Kim & others, 2011; Losel & Bender, 2011; Ttofi & others, 2011a, b) • Discussion of recent research revealing a higher level of depression and suicide in children who are the victims of bullying (Fisher & others, 2012; Lemstra & others, 2012) • Coverage of a recent study that found having supportive friends was linked to lower levels of bullying and victimization (Kendrick, Jutengren, & Stattin, 2012) • Description of a recent longitudinal study of more than 6,000 children that found a link between bullying/victimization and suicide ideation (Winsper & others, 2012) • Coverage of a recent study that found victims of peer bullying were more likely to develop symptoms of borderline personality disorder (Wolke & others, 2012) • New discussion of cyberbullying (Wright & Li, 2013) • Inclusion of recent research indicating that cyberbullying contributed to depression above and beyond the effects of traditional types of bullying (Bonanno & Hymel, 2013) • Description of a recent study linking bullying and moral disengagement (Obermann, 2011) • Updated and expanded coverage of the benefits of positive friendship relationships in adolescence (Harris, Qualter, & Robinson, 2013; Kendrick, Jutengren, & Stattin, 2012; Lopez, Gabbard, & Rodriques, 2013; Tucker & others, 2012; Waller & Rose, 2013; Way & Silverman, 2012) • Coverage of a recent meta-analysis that found a number of gender differences in adolescent girls’ and boys’ friendships (Gorrese & Ruggieri, 2012) • New Connecting with Adolescents box about adolescent girls’ friendships: “We Defined Each Other with Adjectives” • Coverage of a recent study that found students who engaged in aggressive-disruptive classroom behavior were more likely to have aggressive friends (Powers & Bierman, 2012) • Description of a recent study that found some adolescents who identified with certain crowds had more internalizing behavior problems, while others who identified with other crowds had more externalizing problems (Doornwaard & others, 2012) • New description of how play can provide an important context for the development of language and communication skills (Hirsh-Pasek & Golinkoff, 2013) • New discussion of concerns expressed by Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta Golinkoff, and Dorothy Singer (Hirsh-Pasek & others, 2009; Singer, Golinkoff, & Hirsh-Pasek, 2006) about the declining amount of play in young children’s lives, and descriptions of the many positive cognitive and socioemotional outcomes that result from play Chapter 15: Peers and the Sociocultural World • • • • • • Description of a recent study that found autonomy from peers in adolescence produces mixed outcomes in emerging adulthood: (1) avoidance of problem behavior but (2) greater difficulty in establishing strong friendships (Allen, Chango, & Swedo, 2013) Coverage of a recent study linking association with peers who engaged in prosocial or deviant behavior at age 9 to selfcontrol at age 10 (Meldrum & Hay, 2012) Expanded discussion of negative influences of peers to include sexual activity and self-injury outcomes (Coley & others, 2013; You & others, 2013) New research that revealed in countries where family values are more important (India, for example), peer acceptance was less important for adolescents’ life satisfaction than in countries that place more importance on independence from the family (United States and Germany, for example) (Schwartz & others, 2012) Inclusion of recent research with young adolescent Latinas that found a peer-resistance skill-building involving avatar-based reality technology was effective in strengthening the girls’ peer-resistance skills and increasing their resistance to pressure into risky situations (Norris & others, 2013) New discussion of a recent study that found parent-adolescent attachment was associated with peer attachment (Cai & others, 2013) From the Author xxxv • • • • • • • • • • • • Discussion of a recent study that linked social isolation in late adulthood to a greater risk of being inactive, smoking, and engaging in other health-risk behaviors (Shankar & others, 2011) Description of recent longitudinal studies that found feelings of loneliness were linked with an earlier death (Luo & others, 2012; Perissinotto, Stijacic, Cenzer, & Covinsky, 2012) New description of a research study that revealed maximizing one’s psychological resources (self-efficacy and optimism) was linked to a higher quality of life in late adulthood (Bowling & Illiffe, 2011) Expanded discussion of successful aging, including information about the important agenda of continuing to improve our understanding of how people can live longer, healthier, more productive and satisfying lives (Beard & others, 2012; Freund, Nitikin, & Riediger, 2013) Discussion of a recent study across 62 countries that found reported aggressive behavior was higher in individualistic than in collectivistic countries (Bergmuller, 2013) Description of a new study of 8- to 12-year-old girls that found a higher level of media multitasking was linked to negative social well-being while a higher level of face-to-face communication was associated with a higher level of social well-being, such as social success, feeling normal, and having fewer friends whom parents perceived as a bad influence (Pea & others, 2012) Description of a recent study that found heavy media multitaskers were more likely to be depressed and to have social anxiety than their counterparts who engaged in a lower level of media multitasking (Becker, Alzahabi, & Hopwood, 2013) Inclusion of recent research indicating that individuals often engaged in media multitasking because they were less capable of blocking out distractions and focusing on a single task (Sanbonmatsu & others, 2013) Updated and expanded discussion that focuses on the increasing concern about the number of hours young children spend in media and screen time (De Decker & others, 2012; Zimmerman & others, 2012) Greatly expanded coverage of the influence of video games, including research that substantiates the negative effects of playing violent video games (DeWall, Anderson, & Bushman, 2013) but that also indicates positive child outcomes for prosocial skills after playing prosocial video games (Gentile & others, 2009), improved visuospatial skills (Schmidt & Vandewater, 2008), and weight loss for overweight adolescents following video game playing that requires exercise (Bond, Richards, & Calvert, 2013) New commentary noting that some critics conclude that the negative effects of video game violence have been overstated (Ferguson, 2013b), while other critics emphasize that too much attention has been given to the negative effects of video games and inadequate attention to research on possible positive outcomes for some types of video games (Adachi & Willoughby, 2013) Coverage of a recent study that found the more young adolescents engaged in screen time, the lower their academic achievement (Syvaoja & others, 2013) xxxvi From the Author • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Discussion of recent research indicating that greater screen time was associated with adolescent obesity (Mitchell & others, 2013) Description of a recent experimental research study that found overweight adolescents lost more weight following a 10-week competitive condition that involved playing the Nintendo Wii EA Sports Active video (Staiano, Abraham, & Calvert, 2012).

The following leading experts in a number of fields in life-span development provided me with exceptional feedback about what to add, delete, and change in the seventh edition of this book: Ross Thompson, University of California—Davis Patricia Miller, San Francisco State University Philip David Zelazo, University of Minnesota Karen Fingerman, University of Texas—Austin Ross Parke, University of California—Riverside Kirby Deater-Deckard, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Glenn Roisman, University of Minnesota Karlene Ball, University of Alabama—Birmingham Liz Stine-Morrow, University of Illinois General Text Reviewers I also owe a great deal of thanks to the instructors teaching the life-span course who have provided feedback about the book.

S. Census Bureau, 2011) Expanded coverage of intergenerational relationships, including a new discussion of the empty nest and its refilling Description of two recent studies that found middle-aged parents provided more support for their children than for their aging parents (Fingerman & others, 2011, 2012) Coverage of recent research that indicated affection and support, reflecting solidarity, were more prevalent in intergenerational relationships than ambivalence was (Hogerbrugge & Komter, 2012) New discussion of how more than 40 percent of middle-aged children (mainly daughters) provide care for their aging parents or parents-in-law (Blieszner & Roberto, 2012) • Description of a recent study that revealed peer rejection was linked to depression in adolescence (Platt, Kadosh, & Lau, 2013) • Discussion of recent meta-analyses that found being a victim of bullying in middle school was linked to having depression later in adolescence and emerging adulthood, and that bullying in middle school was associated with later engagement in antisocial and criminal behavior (Kim & others, 2011; Losel & Bender, 2011; Ttofi & others, 2011a, b) • Discussion of recent research revealing a higher level of depression and suicide in children who are the victims of bullying (Fisher & others, 2012; Lemstra & others, 2012) • Coverage of a recent study that found having supportive friends was linked to lower levels of bullying and victimization (Kendrick, Jutengren, & Stattin, 2012) • Description of a recent longitudinal study of more than 6,000 children that found a link between bullying/victimization and suicide ideation (Winsper & others, 2012) • Coverage of a recent study that found victims of peer bullying were more likely to develop symptoms of borderline personality disorder (Wolke & others, 2012) • New discussion of cyberbullying (Wright & Li, 2013) • Inclusion of recent research indicating that cyberbullying contributed to depression above and beyond the effects of traditional types of bullying (Bonanno & Hymel, 2013) • Description of a recent study linking bullying and moral disengagement (Obermann, 2011) • Updated and expanded coverage of the benefits of positive friendship relationships in adolescence (Harris, Qualter, & Robinson, 2013; Kendrick, Jutengren, & Stattin, 2012; Lopez, Gabbard, & Rodriques, 2013; Tucker & others, 2012; Waller & Rose, 2013; Way & Silverman, 2012) • Coverage of a recent meta-analysis that found a number of gender differences in adolescent girls’ and boys’ friendships (Gorrese & Ruggieri, 2012) • New Connecting with Adolescents box about adolescent girls’ friendships: “We Defined Each Other with Adjectives” • Coverage of a recent study that found students who engaged in aggressive-disruptive classroom behavior were more likely to have aggressive friends (Powers & Bierman, 2012) • Description of a recent study that found some adolescents who identified with certain crowds had more internalizing behavior problems, while others who identified with other crowds had more externalizing problems (Doornwaard & others, 2012) • New description of how play can provide an important context for the development of language and communication skills (Hirsh-Pasek & Golinkoff, 2013) • New discussion of concerns expressed by Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Roberta Golinkoff, and Dorothy Singer (Hirsh-Pasek & others, 2009; Singer, Golinkoff, & Hirsh-Pasek, 2006) about the declining amount of play in young children’s lives, and descriptions of the many positive cognitive and socioemotional outcomes that result from play Chapter 15: Peers and the Sociocultural World • • • • • • Description of a recent study that found autonomy from peers in adolescence produces mixed outcomes in emerging adulthood: (1) avoidance of problem behavior but (2) greater difficulty in establishing strong friendships (Allen, Chango, & Swedo, 2013) Coverage of a recent study linking association with peers who engaged in prosocial or deviant behavior at age 9 to selfcontrol at age 10 (Meldrum & Hay, 2012) Expanded discussion of negative influences of peers to include sexual activity and self-injury outcomes (Coley & others, 2013; You & others, 2013) New research that revealed in countries where family values are more important (India, for example), peer acceptance was less important for adolescents’ life satisfaction than in countries that place more importance on independence from the family (United States and Germany, for example) (Schwartz & others, 2012) Inclusion of recent research with young adolescent Latinas that found a peer-resistance skill-building involving avatar-based reality technology was effective in strengthening the girls’ peer-resistance skills and increasing their resistance to pressure into risky situations (Norris & others, 2013) New discussion of a recent study that found parent-adolescent attachment was associated with peer attachment (Cai & others, 2013) From the Author xxxv • • • • • • • • • • • • Discussion of a recent study that linked social isolation in late adulthood to a greater risk of being inactive, smoking, and engaging in other health-risk behaviors (Shankar & others, 2011) Description of recent longitudinal studies that found feelings of loneliness were linked with an earlier death (Luo & others, 2012; Perissinotto, Stijacic, Cenzer, & Covinsky, 2012) New description of a research study that revealed maximizing one’s psychological resources (self-efficacy and optimism) was linked to a higher quality of life in late adulthood (Bowling & Illiffe, 2011) Expanded discussion of successful aging, including information about the important agenda of continuing to improve our understanding of how people can live longer, healthier, more productive and satisfying lives (Beard & others, 2012; Freund, Nitikin, & Riediger, 2013) Discussion of a recent study across 62 countries that found reported aggressive behavior was higher in individualistic than in collectivistic countries (Bergmuller, 2013) Description of a new study of 8- to 12-year-old girls that found a higher level of media multitasking was linked to negative social well-being while a higher level of face-to-face communication was associated with a higher level of social well-being, such as social success, feeling normal, and having fewer friends whom parents perceived as a bad influence (Pea & others, 2012) Description of a recent study that found heavy media multitaskers were more likely to be depressed and to have social anxiety than their counterparts who engaged in a lower level of media multitasking (Becker, Alzahabi, & Hopwood, 2013) Inclusion of recent research indicating that individuals often engaged in media multitasking because they were less capable of blocking out distractions and focusing on a single task (Sanbonmatsu & others, 2013) Updated and expanded discussion that focuses on the increasing concern about the number of hours young children spend in media and screen time (De Decker & others, 2012; Zimmerman & others, 2012) Greatly expanded coverage of the influence of video games, including research that substantiates the negative effects of playing violent video games (DeWall, Anderson, & Bushman, 2013) but that also indicates positive child outcomes for prosocial skills after playing prosocial video games (Gentile & others, 2009), improved visuospatial skills (Schmidt & Vandewater, 2008), and weight loss for overweight adolescents following video game playing that requires exercise (Bond, Richards, & Calvert, 2013) New commentary noting that some critics conclude that the negative effects of video game violence have been overstated (Ferguson, 2013b), while other critics emphasize that too much attention has been given to the negative effects of video games and inadequate attention to research on possible positive outcomes for some types of video games (Adachi & Willoughby, 2013) Coverage of a recent study that found the more young adolescents engaged in screen time, the lower their academic achievement (Syvaoja & others, 2013) xxxvi From the Author • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Discussion of recent research indicating that greater screen time was associated with adolescent obesity (Mitchell & others, 2013) Description of a recent experimental research study that found overweight adolescents lost more weight following a 10-week competitive condition that involved playing the Nintendo Wii EA Sports Active video (Staiano, Abraham, & Calvert, 2012).

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